Milk thistle tea

Stachyose food additives

Milk thistle tea

26/11/2021 blog 0

Milk thistle is a weed (and we mean that in the nicest way possible) that you’ve probably seen hundreds of times before. Tall, spiky, with purple or white wispy looking flower on top. But did you know it packs some serious health benefits too?
It contains silymarin, which is claimed to be like a Limitless pill for your liver. Some herbal medicine experts also recommend its use for breastfeeding.
But is it really all that and a bag of chips, or is it all hype? Come thistle-way and let’s find out!
Nutrition: what’s in it?
It’s pretty hard to pin down exactly what’s in your milk thistle tea, because it all depends on how much milk thistle you use, how hot the water is, and how long you let it steep.
But we do know that milk thistle itself contains a group of compounds known collectively as silymarin — and it contains a LOT of these compounds (they’re supposedly where all the milk thistle magic comes from).
Milk thistle seeds (which are used to make the tea, along with the leaves) are also loaded with essential minerals like potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and chloride.
Milk thistle tea is also super rich in antioxidants, with similar antioxidant content as green tea.
The possible benefits
Let’s get sily(marin)! Here’s a quick roundup of the many potential benefits of thippin on the thistle:
Liver health
Silymarin’s antioxidant potential seems to be most powerful regarding liver function.
It can reduce the production of free radicals (unstable compounds that can attack your cells, chaotic neutral at best and chaotic evil at high levels), promote effective fat metabolism, and prevent toxins (for example, from medications like ibuprofen) from binding to liver cell receptors.
There have been promising results in the treatment of cirrhosis, alcohol-related liver damage, and non-alcoholic-related liver disease. In human studies, though, the results aren’t quite as awe-inspiring as some animal and test-tube findings.
Also, the vast majority of high quality human studies used isolated silymarin rather than milk thistle or milk thistle tea, so we can’t say across the board that these effects will come from drinking milk thistle tea either.
Blood sugar management
Silybin, the key component of silymarin, may help to reduce blood sugar levels in people with diabetes and regulate insulin (the key hormone that manages blood sugar).
These effects have been noted in humans (yay!) as well as in animal and test-tube studies, but most of the human studies have been tiny — so take these findings with a grain of salt.
Symptom reduction in people with cancer
A handful of studies have shown that milk thistle may be beneficial for people with cancer because it can help reduce some of the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation. In particular, it may protect against chemo-related liver damage and damage to the skin and mucosa caused by radiation.
Bone health
Some animal studies have shown that silymarin may affect the genes that regulate bone growth and bone loss, with an overall positive, strengthening effect for brittle or osteoporotic bones.